Are Malay Graduates and Job Seekers being Discriminated in Malaysia? Yes, finds this study.

malay graduates

High number of unemployed graduates, especially Malay graduates are not news in this country. We hear them blaming everything but themselves. But what if the Malays are indeed being discriminated against? Yeah right, I muttered at first, as someone who is sometimes ashamed by my own race (how could I not, when I’m assumed to be ‘easily swayed and confused’ half the time?).

Trying to keep an open mind, I read this study, and was quite puzzled by the findings. It was entitled ‘Discrimination in high degrees: Race and graduate hiring in Malaysia‘ and was published in the Journal of Asia Pacific Economy by UM and UKM researchers. Here’s the paper abstract (bold is my own):

This paper investigates racial discrimination in hiring fresh degree graduates in Malaysia through a field experiment. We send fictitious Malay and Chinese resumes to job advertisements, then analyse differentials in callback for interview attributable to racial identity, while controlling for applicant characteristics, employer profile and job requirements. We find that race matters much more than resume quality, with Malays  Malaysia’s majority group  significantly less likely to be called for interview. Other factors, particularly language proficiency of employees, language requirements of jobs and profile of employers, influence employer biases. Applicants fluent in Chinese fare better, and Chinese-controlled and foreign-controlled companies are more likely to favour Chinese resumes, indicating that cultural compatibility explains part of the discrimination. Malay resumes tend to be perceived and prejudged adversely, and employers’ attitudes towards public policy outcomes, particularly pertaining to education quality and employment opportunity in the public sector, also account for the observed racial disparities.

Let me simplify that for you:

When researchers sent fake resumes of Malay and Chinese fresh graduates, the Malay applicants are much less likely to be called back for an interview. Employers perceive Malays negatively, think that they have lower-quality education and always have the safety net in the form of government jobs to fall back on.

Huh. I’ve never been pro-Malay, but I hate discrimination more. How was the research conducted to come to this conclusion?

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50 Ways to Save Money in Malaysia, From Easy to Impossible

Ways to Save Money in Malaysia

In my Masterpost: How to save money in Malaysia article, I gave examples of what I personally did to save money. Some were successful, some were not. I thought it would be fun to list all the ways that I tried, and give them a rank. There will be four levels: easy, medium, hard, and impossible.

Note: This is not a comprehensive list of all the ways to save money in Malaysia. I don’t know much about how to save money on home ownership, for example, or how to save money for families. Regardless I think it can be a good start 🙂

Ways to Save Money in Malaysia

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Must-Have Financial Tools to Make Freelancing in Malaysia Easier

 freelancing in malaysia

Freelancing in Malaysia is not hard, but I think there is a steep learning curve when it comes to managing finances. Based on the conversations I’ve had, many freelancers in Malaysia have a ‘whatever works’ system. This leads to many undesirable side-effects, like:

  • Losing money to ridiculous fees
  • Lack of protection and recourse for clients who don’t pay
  • Indirect loss of income due to perceived lack of professionalism image

It’s hard to write about the complete range of tools that is needed for every freelancer in Malaysia. Some of you are freelance writers, freelance graphic designers, freelance artists. Some of you may freelance with companies like Uber, part-time as insurance/unit trust agents, do promoter-type work for events, or even MLM-type ‘business opportunities’.

For the purpose of this article, I’m going to focus on the must-have financial tools for online-based freelancing jobs, but the tools can be handy for anyone freelancing in Malaysia.

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18 Things You Can Get or Donate in Freecycle Malaysia

freecycle malaysia


Freecycling is a combination of 2 words – free and recycling. The whole idea is to offer items in good condition to other people, for free. I’ve joined Freecycling communities since my student days in UK, and both donated and received items from kind people who simply want to reduce their environmental impact. Indirectly, you get to save money and encourage community interaction, too. It’s a great concept.

I even got a bicycle from a nice lady. It got stolen the next day, but still. Thief, I hope you get better use of the bicycle than me. But I was a poor student who during that time was walking 30 minutes to school in order to save money on bus fare, so you’re kind of an asshole.

Some people asked me – what can you get from Freecycle? Rather than saying ‘anything’, I thought I can give an idea of the kinds of things you can expect to find there. Here are 18 things you can get or donate in Freecycle Malaysia.

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