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[Sponsored] How Asukabu App Helped Me Understand Malaysian Stocks

Malaysian Stocks

I never really understood Malaysian stocks. Like, I know how to get them and all, but I don’t get them. I don’t know how to answer, ‘Which Malaysian stocks should I buy?’

(For the record, this is how you get Malaysian stocks: open a CDS account, add some money, buy the stocks you want at the price you want and keep it until you want to sell it)

This went on for a while until someone from Asukabu commented on one of my posts and mentioned the app. You can learn about Malaysian stocks, he said. I’m like, okay, sure I like learning, I’ll try it out.

Using Asukabu to survey Malaysian stocks

There was this lightbulb moment as I was using the Asukabu app. It kinda clicked after that. Ohhh, that’s how you select a company, from a million* companies out there.

*not real statistics. I don’t know the actual number.

It went something like this.

*opens Asukabu app*

*sees the company of the day*

*sees the percentage of people voting up or down*

Malaysian stocks

 

Ohhhhhhhhhhhh

That’s it. That’s why stocks never really made sense to me. I have access to company information, sure, all thousands of pages of it (whether I read them is a different story). But I didn’t have access to PUBLIC SENTIMENT before!

Real public sentiment is what people on the street thinks of the company. It’s very hard to get if you’re not in the ‘we-talk-about-stocks’ circles. I used to regularly read The Star business page and sometimes read The Edge (this one always leave me more confused tbh), but I’ve learned to never take them too seriously. Of course major newspapers can’t print negative information about big companies. They rely on them for advertising money.

Public sentiment is a core part of stocks investing, for stocks experts and non-experts alike. Companies that do well tend to be companies that people love and use. It’s like a self-fulfilling prophecy. How many times have you notice the stock price of Company A increasing after a positive announcement, driven up by new and existing shareholders who genuinely believe in the future of the company?

The reverse is true. Negative news and bad PR make people dump their stocks = lower price.

Public sentiment. It’s important. Other than browsing forums and talking to many, many people, you can now have an idea of Company A’s public sentiment through the Asukabu app.

Quickest way to learn about Malaysian stocks and their companies

Obviously you have to learn about the company before you buy their stocks right? But that’s a full-time job. There are fund managers out there whose exact job scope is company research and selection.

For me, I just want to survey the Malaysian stocks scene before I’m convinced enough to pull the trigger and make the stocks purchase. But who has the time to compile 50 or so companies and their information? I don’t want to invest in all of them (not enough money), I want to invest in the best of the 50.

In the Asukabu app, you get:

  • The Trivia and Quick info page,
  • The latest news headlines for the company,
  • And the public sentiment for the company (you can vote as well)
  • (Plus a ‘school’, explaining about Stocks 101)
Malaysian stocks
Hands up if you also didn’t know that Shell changed their name to Hengyuan
Malaysian stocks
I like that Syariah status is also included

One weekday = one company profile.

One week = five company profiles.

One month = 22-24 company profiles.

A couple of months into the app, I have more understanding in the Malaysian stocks scene. I’ve learned basic must-know information of popular Malaysian companies like Shell, Petronas, AirAsia and many more, plus the public sentiment for these companies (AirAsia is overwhelmingly positive).

That’s pretty cool. I’m still in the surveying process, but now I have an idea of which companies I’d consider investing in, when the time comes for me to diversify into stocks.

Conclusion

If you:

  • Heard about stocks as a good option as investment, but don’t know how to start, or
  • Want to have access to public sentiment, or at least a rough indication of it,

Try out the Asukabu app. They don’t sell anything, but they do have a partnership with Rakuten Trade. I heard decent things about it, but check out this post by DividendMagic comparing the different fee structures of different stock broker accounts (the article will also show you the steps to open a CDS account). Rakuten Trade seems to be the only one that limits its trading fees, unlike the rest.

Would you consider investing in Malaysian stocks? Why or why not? Do you think Asukabu can help you with that? Comment below!

Asukabu download links:

If the images don’t work for whatever reason, here’s the links: Android | iOS

Author

6 comments

  1. Unfortunately index funds in Malaysia aren’t very good as the ones overseas, but if they do, they would be a better option as compared to individual stocks.

    1. Thanks for the info Manmeet. I’ve heard of those and know a couple of people who do it. Not sure of the process. Can’t imagine its easy to find syariah options there though.

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